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Why Cloudflare Terminated Daily Stormer

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Matthew Prince, CEO of Cloudflare:

Earlier today, Cloudflare terminated the account of the Daily Stormer. We’ve stopped proxying their traffic and stopped answering DNS requests for their sites. We’ve taken measures to ensure that they cannot sign up for Cloudflare’s services ever again.

Our terms of service reserve the right for us to terminate users of our network at our sole discretion. The tipping point for us making this decision was that the team behind Daily Stormer made the claim that we were secretly supporters of their ideology.

Our team has been thorough and have had thoughtful discussions for years about what the right policy was on censoring. Like a lot of people, we’ve felt angry at these hateful people for a long time but we have followed the law and remained content neutral as a network. We could not remain neutral after these claims of secret support by Cloudflare.

Now, having made that decision, let me explain why it’s so dangerous.

I’m a staunch First Amendment supporter. I believe these Nazi motherfuckers have a right to publish their garbage propaganda. But they don’t have a right to Cloudflare services. Prince’s thoughtful explanation makes clear that this was a last resort, and hopefully one-time exception, to their policy of not censoring sites over political content.

The internet really changes the way this works, though. In the print days, there was no equivalent of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. There are only a handful of very large companies that can defend against a DDoS attack, and Cloudflare is one of them. Now that Cloudflare has dropped them, their web site is unreachable.

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martinbaum
37 days ago
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The reminds me tangentially of how we learned years later that at the height of the GWB administration only one telco hadn't just handed over the keys to their data centers when requested by the Feds. Good for CloudFlare for thinking about this hard. I suspect he's pretty singular in that regard.
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2 public comments
jkevmoses
36 days ago
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The quote:

"And, after today, make no mistake, it will be a little bit harder for us to argue against a government somewhere pressuring us into taking down a site they don't like."

is the scary part of the statement made. I'm not saying it is the beginning of the slippery slope but it is giving a victory to the heckler's veto.
McKinney, Texas
duerig
37 days ago
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I've seen several links to this letter and the story now, but this is the first time I've actually clicked through and read it. I really like the CloudFlare CEO's formulation of the issue. It isn't about free speech, either here or when Facebook's censor army is at work or when any other private company chooses what messages it wants to broadcast over its networks. They are private companies and as such they are not obligated to be common carriers if they don't want to be. It is about due process. So the secret rules behind Facebook's censor army or the ones that lead to people being arbitrarily banned from twitter are not problems because they 'violate free speech'. They are problems because they violate due process. And due process needs to continue to operate even when heinous people and vile acts are involved. It especially needs to operate when vile acts are involved because the potential punishments are severe and we must ensure that those punished are culpable.

CloudFlare seems to have done the right thing. They did not give in to calls for vigilante justice. They only terminated their relationship when the party in question misrepresented that relationship. Whatever hate speech is, that needs to be defined by us collectively as part of our democratic process and enforced by the same due process mechanisms we use for other crimes. It must not be left to arbitrary secret guidelines chosen by private companies.

Pinned Tabs Are No Solution to the Lack of Favicons in Regular Safari Tabs

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Re: yesterday’s piece arguing that Safari should display favicons in its browser tabs, I’ve gotten dozens of emails and tweets pointing out that Safari does show favicons, albeit in monochrome, for pinned tabs.

First, so what? That’s great for pinned tabs but it’s not a solution in any way shape or form for regular tabs.

Second, they’re not even really favicons. They’re SVG files, not PNGs like real favicons. Even though SVG is an open format and Safari introduced this feature in 2015, no other browser in the world supports these images, so many websites don’t even have these graphics. Almost every website has a real favicon.

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martinbaum
42 days ago
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Sometimes I think he gets on these windmill tilts because he likes to pretend he's crashd.
crashd
42 days ago
That's an asshole thing to say for many reasons.
superlopuh
42 days ago
I wish I could favourite comments
crashd
41 days ago
Touché
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Medium’s Dickbar Gets the Clap

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Whether you think this feature is a good idea or not, why the fuck would they put this button on top of the text of the article you’re trying to read?

I’m starting to think Medium is just fucking with me at this point.

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martinbaum
43 days ago
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Every Ahab needs a white whale, and this is becoming Gruber's. He has a good point, but heh.
MotherHydra
40 days ago
Beautifully analogized.
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jhamill
43 days ago
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I truly hope Medium is fucking with Gruber on purpose now.
California
mcormier
43 days ago
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I thought the title meant that the dickbar was sick as in it got Gonorrhea and was being killed off. Nope.

Alphabet shares hit $1,000 this morning

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Alphabet subsidiary Google hit the same milestone in 2013, and Amazon hit it for the first time last month.

What’s hot? Alphabet stock.

Alphabet shares crossed the $1,000 line for the first time this morning, when at 9:40 am they hit $1,001.25. They climbed to $1,007.15 over the next 15 minutes, before descending to 1002.54 as of 11:45 am.

Amazon crossed the same threshold last month, and Alphabet subsidiary Google passed it in 2013, before it was reorganized as holding company Alphabet.

Few stocks ever cross the $1,000 milestone, and any kind of high peak that catches the notice of investors can also read as a red flag.


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martinbaum
109 days ago
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This is possibly the dumbest article ever written. Does anybody at Recode know what a split is?
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★ Dropping Tech Giants

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Great interactive feature by Farhad Manjoo for The New York Times:

Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft and Alphabet, the parent company of Google, are not just the largest technology companies in the world. As I’ve argued repeatedly in my column, they are also becoming the most powerful companies of any kind, essentially inescapable for any consumer or business that wants to participate in the modern world. But which of the Frightful Five is most unavoidable? I ponder the question in my column this week.

But what about you? If an evil monarch forced you to choose, in what order would you give up these inescapable giants of tech?

Great question. I love thought exercises.

My order (from first dropped to last):

  1. Facebook. I love Instagram, but could live without it. I don’t use anything else Facebook offers.

  2. Microsoft. The only Microsoft product I use regularly is Skype, for podcasting, and I suspect I could find another solution. (If I couldn’t, I might have to rethink my answer here.)

  3. Amazon. I buy stuff from Amazon almost every week. I just counted — 11 orders so far in 2017. My wife buys stuff from Amazon even more frequently. But just about anything we buy at Amazon, we could buy elsewhere. It’d be painful to replace, but not irreplaceable. There are a couple of shows exclusive to Amazon Prime that I enjoy, but none that I love.

  4. Alphabet. I already use DuckDuckGo as my default search engine, so giving up Google search would be frustrating at times, but not a deal breaker. I use a few email accounts backed by Gmail, but I actually dislike Gmail, and have been procrastinating on moving all my mail to FastMail for years. I despise Google Docs. I don’t use any Android devices other than as a curiosity. I greatly prefer Safari over Chrome. YouTube, however, is irreplaceable, and so essential that it pretty much singlehandedly catapults Alphabet to #2 in my list.

  5. Apple. I mean, come on. If not for Apple I’d be stuck using computers I don’t like and a phone that I consider a distant second-best. With all the other companies on the list, what I’d miss most are certain of their services — Instagram, Skype, Amazon’s store, YouTube — but Apple is only company in the world whose hardware I consider irreplaceable. And you need the hardware to make best use of the services from any other companies.

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martinbaum
134 days ago
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"5. Apple. I mean, come on, I'd be unemployed."
duerig
134 days ago
Hahaha. So true.
mareino
134 days ago
Sadly, that is why I'd drop Microsoft last. I tried to use non-MS products a couple years ago as a test, and it was the closest I ever came to getting fired.
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toddgrotenhuis
128 days ago
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Switch 4 and 5, and you've got me.
Indianapolis
internetionals
133 days ago
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My order would be: Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Aphabet, Facebook

The reason is pretty simple: you can go all Apple, all Microsoft or all OSS. Sure you might miss out on some fronts, but none of those options is unrealistic. Apple is clearly the easier to drop as lots of people I know use none of their products at all.

Amazon and Alphabet are trickier to avoid alltogether. For a large part because all the cloud offerings. But between those two Amazon is the easier to drop, because you can do everything they offer using Alphabet provided services, but not the other way around.

Interestingly, for me at least, dropping Facebook would be the hardest relatively speaking and I dont't actually use Facebook. The main reason, for me, is them owning Whatsapp. Staying in touch and sharing things with multiple persons would be a lot harder and you would have to convince them all to a specific other service.
Netherlands
wmorrell
134 days ago
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My ordering was identical to the NYT author: Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, Alphabet, Amazon. Though my reasoning included everything that depends on AWS; if it's just buying stuff and Kindle and Prime, then it's way easier to give up Amazon. Most service alternatives to the other four will have some dependency on AWS.
rtreborb
130 days ago
Amazon has silently made AWS an indispensable product, one likely used by most of the other 4 companies
jheiss
134 days ago
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My ordering was Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Apple, Amazon.

I could easily live without or find alternatives to Microsoft, Facebook, and Google. Alternatives to Apple are less pleasant, but tolerable. Amazon would be hard for me to live without.
onepointzero
134 days ago
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I believe DuckDuckGo uses Bing behind the scenes. Microsoft may be more useful than he thinks.
Brussels, Belgium
gglockner
134 days ago
Yandex - see bottom right corner
onepointzero
134 days ago
Indeed. My bad. It used to be Bing.
evaryont
134 days ago
It's both. Lately it seems to rely on Yandex more often than not, but it uses a melding of a bunch of providers and it's own limited scraping.

New Google Docs Phishing Scam, Almost Undetectable

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I have a few friends and some people I follow on Twitter who’ve been sent this already. Seems dastardly clever.

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martinbaum
143 days ago
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About an hour ago I got one of these message from somebody I haven't corresponded with in years. It showed BCCs so I thought what's up with this?
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