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Steam Drops MacOS From VR Support

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Steam:

SteamVR has ended OSX support so our team can focus on Windows and Linux.

You can see how relevant Steam has considered the Mac to VR gaming by the fact that they call it “OSX” — a name they misspelled and which Apple changed four years ago.

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martinbaum
94 days ago
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I suppose you could also ask, "How relevant is VR gaming?" I'm sure there is an enthiastic fanbase, but how significant is it?
duerig
93 days ago
Much like the gaming fanbase on Macs themselves: a small niche that is slowly growing. I can see why a niche of a niche would not be really viable.
tingham
93 days ago
The macOS gaming market is not growing.
duerig
93 days ago
I'd assumed that the installed userbase for Macs was growing still (if slowly). But I think that they are both similar (niche markets with special needs for programming/porting games for them) even if the derivative has a different sign.
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jhamill
93 days ago
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People still call it the iwatch. Who cares about a stupid name?
California

WeWork and Counterfeit Capitalism

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Matt Stoller, in his Big newsletter:

Endless money-losing is a variant of counterfeiting, and counterfeiting has dangerous economic consequences. The subprime fiasco was one example. Another example was the Worldcom fraud in the late 1990s, which forced the rest of the U.S. telecom sector to over-invest into broadband. Competitors have to copy their fraudulent competitors. It’s a variant of Gresham’s Law, which says that “bad money drives out good.” If you can counterfeit something for cheap, the counterfeit will eventually take over the entire market and drive out the real commodity. That is what is happening in our economy writ large, a kind of counterfeit capitalism as ‘leaders’ like Neumann are celebrated and actual leaders who can make things and manage are treated like dogshit.

This kind of counterfeit capitalism is terrible for society as a whole. At first, with companies like Walmart and Amazon, predatory pricing can seem smart. The entire retail sector might be decimated and communities across America might be harmed, but two day shipping is convenient and Walmart and Amazon do have positive cash flow. But increasingly with cheap capital and a narrow slice of financiers who want to copy the winners, there is a second or third generation of companies asking Wall Street to just ‘trust me.’

Compelling argument. I have always been deeply suspicious of any company whose business model is “lose a ton of money for the foreseeable future and eventually we’ll make a fortune”. It’s the South Park “Collect Underpants / … / Profit” business model, but real investors pump billions into it.

As a kid, when I heard the fable of the emperor with no clothes, I never bought the lesson, because I just couldn’t believe adults would go along with a sham that their own eyes told them wasn’t true. Turns out it happens all the time, over and over.

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martinbaum
311 days ago
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In this case, though, you could argue that the market is acting exactly as it should be, now that the IPO is a shambles, the CEO is out, and the venture fund that tried to ram this exact philosophy through wasn't able to pull off exactly what is being described, here.
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∞ People who remember every second of their life

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As someone who can’t remember what he had for lunch last week, this “ability” is fascinating to me.

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martinbaum
649 days ago
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I would die of shame reliving all of the stupid things I've said at the wrong moment.
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MotherHydra
649 days ago
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Sounds like a slightly torturous existence if you ask me.
Space City, USA

★ Scuttlebutt Regarding Apple’s Cross-Platform UI Project

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Back in late December, Mark Gurman published an intriguing report at Bloomberg regarding a secret cross-platform project at Apple:

Starting as early as next year, software developers will be able to design a single application that works with a touchscreen or mouse and trackpad depending on whether it’s running on the iPhone and iPad operating system or on Mac hardware, according to people familiar with the matter. […]

Apple is developing the strategy as part of the next major iOS and macOS updates, said the people, who requested anonymity to discuss an internal matter. Codenamed “Marzipan,” the secret project is planned as a multiyear effort that will start rolling out as early as next year and may be announced at the company’s annual developers conference in the summer. The plans are still fluid, the people said, so the implementation could change or the project could still be canceled.

I wrote an extensive piece speculating on what it might really mean.

This “Marzipan” rumor got a lot of people excited. But Gurman’s report is so light on technical details that the excitement is based mostly on what developers hope it could mean, not what’s actually been reported. The less specific the rumor, the easier it is to project your own wishes upon it. And, oddly perhaps, we haven’t seen any additional rumors or details about this project in the four months since Gurman’s original report.

I’ve heard a few things, from first- and second-hand sources. Mostly second-hand, to be honest, but they’re all consistent with each other.

The Name: There is indeed an active cross-platform UI project at Apple for iOS and MacOS. It may have been codenamed “Marzipan” at one point, but if so only in its earliest days. My various little birdies only know of the project under a different name, which hasn’t leaked publicly yet. There are people at Apple who know about this project who first heard the name “Marzipan” when Gurman’s story was published.

What Is It? I don’t have extensive details, but basically it sounds like a declarative control API. The general idea is that rather than writing classic procedural code to, say, make a button, then configure the button, then position the button inside a view, you instead declare the button and its attributes using some other form. HTML is probably the most easily understood example. In HTML you don’t procedurally create elements like paragraphs, images, and tables — you declare them with tags and attributes in markup. There’s an industry-wide trend toward declaration, perhaps best exemplified by React, that could be influencing Apple in this direction.

There’s nothing inherently cross-platform about a declarative control API. But it makes sense that if Apple believes that (a) iOS and MacOS should have declarative control APIs, and (b) they should address the problem of abstracting the API differences between UIKit (iOS) and AppKit (MacOS), that they would tackle them at the same time. Or perhaps the logic is simply that if they’re going to create a cross-platform UI framework, the basis for that framework should be a declarative user interface.

When: I’m nearly certain this project is not debuting at WWDC 2018 in June, and I doubt that 2018 was on the table in December. It’s a 2019 thing, for MacOS 10.15 and iOS 13.1 I would set your expectations accordingly for this year’s WWDC.


  1. My guess is this is all part of the updated UI for iOS 13 coming next year. ↩︎

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martinbaum
825 days ago
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Anybody else feeling like Gruber’s been cut off from the high level sources and is wandering in the Apple PR wilderness?
MotherHydra
823 days ago
He’s fallen out of favor to be sure and his “little birdies” are retail-tier employees (they all get @apple.com addresses). Essentially it is live action role-playing.
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sirshannon
825 days ago
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So... XAML?

Elon Musk Memo on the State of Tesla

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Skip the Electrek summary and scroll down to the memo itself. It’s a cogent and inspiring read:

Most of the design tolerances of the Model 3 are already better than any other car in the world. Soon, they will all be better. This is not enough. We will keep going until the Model 3 build precision is a factor of ten better than any other car in the world. I am not kidding.

Our car needs to be designed and built with such accuracy and precision that, if an owner measures dimensions, panel gaps and flushness, and their measurements don’t match the Model 3 specs, it just means that their measuring tape is wrong.

Some parts suppliers will be unwilling or unable to achieve this level of precision. I understand that this will be considered an unreasonable request by some. That’s ok, there are lots of other car companies with much lower standards. They just can’t work with Tesla.

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martinbaum
839 days ago
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Many seem to think Musk is the second coming of Jobs. He might prove himself worthy of that, and he might not, but Jobs shipped at scale. That’s incredibly difficult and I don’t see a Tim Cook anywhere near Tesla.
satadru
838 days ago
Shipping at scale is easy if you're willing to go to China, integrate yourself into a Shenzen supply chain, and have people on the ground to monitor and resist quality fade. I'm not sure that works for vehicles, which have much of their (much more slowly iterating) supply chain here in the US.
martinbaum
838 days ago
Very good point. But, of course, Musk has bet the company on scale with the Model 3. He can always fall back on revolutionizing space launches, though. Pretty incredible success, there.
thepyrate
838 days ago
Wasn’t Tim Cook almost singularly instrumental in the scale of distribution Jobs demanded through his decade+ managing the supply chain? You basically listed Tim Cook’s achievement and then said Tim Cook would never come near achieving that...
martinbaum
838 days ago
I said Elon Musk has no Tim Cook. By many accounts he is directing operations himself.
thepyrate
838 days ago
Ah yes, I think I read your original comment back to front
satadru
838 days ago
@martinbaum agree on space launches vs Tesla, (especially with regard to Roscosmos throwing in the towel on competing with China & SpaceX today, supposedly) but I'd also note that Musk's primary goal with Tesla, like with SpaceX was not to make electric cars and compete in the rocketry business, but to totally redefine the field and make electric cars a viable market with the goal of saving the planet. In that, he has wildly succeeded. Electric cars are no longer the micro-niche market they used to be, but high end competitors which threaten every company vehicles for prestige and which have set the goal for multiple vehicle manufacturers. (Similar to how SpaceX has always been a means to an end of the colonization of Mars via lowering the costs of taking goods and people to space from the exorbitant costs charged by legacy state-subsidized conglomerates.) The proximal goal of Tesla and SpaceX has always been to survive and push the market. That they've recently led the market is a surprise I don't think Musk anticipated. But unlike Apple (& Jobs) at least Musk seems to be willing to fail fast and try new things, without stubbornly sticking to what worked yesterday and hoping it works tomorrow. In that he's very much unlike Jobs, and amusingly, somewhat a combination of the good traits we recall in both Tesla & Edison...
martinbaum
838 days ago
I'm coming around to your way of viewing Musk, but I'd still hate to be a Tesla investor. I do think he's got a tin ear about that, as his April Fool's joke demonstrates.
satadru
838 days ago
100% I'd hate to be a Musk investor. His short term goals aren't aligned with those of investors looking to make short-term monetary gains, and frankly, I'm ok with that...
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Gurman: HomePod Sales Lower Than Apple Expected

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Mark Gurman, writing for Bloomberg:

During the HomePod’s first 10 weeks of sales, it eked out 10 percent of the smart speaker market, compared with 73 percent for Amazon’s Echo devices and 14 percent for the Google Home, according to Slice Intelligence. Three weeks after the launch, weekly HomePod sales slipped to about 4 percent of the smart speaker category on average, the market research firm says. Inventory is piling up, according to Apple store workers, who say some locations are selling fewer than 10 HomePods a day.

I don’t put much value in comments from Slice Intelligence or anonymous suppliers, but Apple Store employees are saying they’re only selling single digits per day, that sounds bad. (Would love to hear from any readers out there who work in Apple retail.) But I’d love some context on this. How many iPhones does a typical Apple Store sell per day? MacBooks? Apple TVs?

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martinbaum
844 days ago
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A category in search of a use case.
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